Review

The Artist

By no means is The Artist just a novelty; it is a love letter to a bygone era and tribute to the Hollywood silent movies of old. This black and white silent movie rolls back the years on a modern day cinema scene that is saturated in CGI, graphic violence and 3D. This impeccable and beautiful story line is peppered with plenty of humour and is drenched with first class performances, which is sure to win any viewer over.

It’s Hollywood 1927 and George Valentin is a silent movie superstar. The advent of the talkies will soon spell out the end of his career, but for young extra Peppy Miller, it seems the sky is the limit. As the two characters play their respective descending and ascending roles, George sinks all his money into one last epic silent film, while Peppy becomes a star in the new era. In just a few years, she’s become Tinsel town’s new ‘It’ girl, and he’s a Hollywood has-been of a silent-movie yesteryear. Filmed in black and white, without dialogue, The Artist tells the story of what happens when they meet and share their dreams and ambitions.

Despite the story being anything but original, drawing comparisons with Singing in the Rain, in both plot and setting, The Artist is full of so much magic and charm that you will find this film simply irresistible. With first class cast starring the brilliant Jean Dujardin as George Valentin and the enchanting Berenice Bejo as Peppy Miller, this film oozes class. A brilliant supporting cast including James Cromwell and John Goodman, but the show is nearly stolen by Uggie, the loveable Jack Russell Terrier.

The Artist is written and directed by Michel Hazanavicius and includes a brilliant musical score by Ludovic Bource that sets the pace and mood of every scene transporting you back 80 years into a golden age of cinema. With stunningly beautiful cinematography, there are very few films that sparkle and shine like this little black and white, silent spectacle. In the case of The Artist, silence really is golden.

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